Corniglia, Cinque Terre, ITALIA

“MAKE NO LITTLE PLANS” (Daniel Burnham)

First Entrant, Simple, Scalable, Timely, Socially Sustainable Solution to a Big and Growing National and Increasingly International HEALTH & INEQUALITY Problem

The PROBLEM:

Current and growing health problems associated with poor eating habits (contributing to obesity, diabetes, etc.) afflict everyone in one way or another where fast-food prevails and fast-food prevails virtually everywhere AND income inequality particularly in the food service sector make it virtually impossible for hard working people to work their way out of poverty.

Our SOLUTION:

Lilly’s authentic, truly unique, and as first entrant, disruptive solution to the health crisis arising from poor eating habits is a keenly focused product offering consisting of a few simple high quality, healthier, appealing and tasty old world charm ITALIAN “snack” foods as found in a typical small (approx. 1,500 sf) Italian bread bakery shop (panificio) on a mostly TAKE-OUT and DELIVERY basis (NOT full service restaurant), and service that connects with customers. Simple and inviting yet elegant Italian store design / panache, and emphasis on social sustainability will position Lilly’s as a compelling healthier “SLOW FOOD” alternative to “fast food” inspiring customers with better eating habits that contribute to better health facilitating a more fulfilling life. Tasty, healthier offerings satisfy the palate contributing to portion control. We will do our part to combat poverty and income inequality by paying employees a living wage (social sustainability).

The OPPORTUNITY:

Leverage our simplicity and uniqueness so as to scale and create a brand quickly. We will roll-out in NYC,  then perfect the model and open approx. 39 shops in NYC within 3 years. NYC will serve as the springboard for national expansion (669 shops within 10 years), and eventually internationally.

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In 1987, General Foods, Proctor & Gamble and Nestle owned nearly 90% of the U.S. coffee market. They didn't worry about start-up companies taking away a large share of their market. While the big three conducted business as usual, STARBUCKS recognized and capitalized on the fact that customer priorities were changing. By 1993, Starbucks owned 22% of the national coffee market, about $1 Billion. In 2015, Starbucks revenues were $19.1 Billion.

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